Things to Consider When Buying Golf Course Property

Have you ever thought of staying on a golf course? You may want to do that if you’re addicted to the game. However, a word of caution: do your research and meet with an experienced real estate agent who is familiar with the area before taking the plunge. Use care, just as you would when playing the game, because there is more to investing in a golf course as real estate than meets the eye. Most Expensive Golf Course

Golfers’ chatter, weekend noise, and repeated golf ball hits that can fall on your property are all things you must either get used to or learn to tune out. These items, however, are included in the kit. On the plus side, you’ll have a fantastic golf course view from your back porch whenever you want.

Over the last decade, golf course homes have become increasingly popular in Florida, and they are mostly built with stucco, which is an excellent option for a Florida home. They are well-built, low-maintenance, and typically the most cost-effective exterior construction choice in the tropics.

Determine if you want to keep this golf course home as a year-round residence or as a vacation getaway. If the house is unoccupied for an extended period of time, snowbirds and other seasonal residents can pay a visit and stay. Another concern is protection, as well as privacy. This is better achieved for assets on the fairway. Look for gated communities, which provide a limited amount of privacy and protection.

You may want to protect your property with some nets, but many golf courses have Homeowners Associations that forbid nets from being used in backyards. Before committing to buy any land, particularly those with a common view, always ask your real estate agent for a copy of the rules. There may be laws that you don’t want to follow or rules that are too lenient for your needs.

What is the price of the golf course house you want to buy? What does a round of golf at this location cost? A ratio of these two variables will help you figure out how much property costs in this area and whether buying is a good option for you. Don’t presume that owning a home on a golf course entitles you to refer to the golf course as your normal extension; this isn’t always the case. Many golf course houses in Florida have walls surrounding them, so check to see if this is necessary. Property values along a golf course are known to vary depending on venue. Homes on the greens, for example, are the most costly, whereas those on the fairways are usually less expensive.